Would you include this in your report?

I shopped a fast food restaurant and one of the employees' pants were quite low with his underwear very much visible. He had to continually hike up the pants. Would you include this in your report? I can't really see where it fits in with the questions. The only question I see about uniform or appearance is quite specific - were they wearing proper shirt, apron and no nametag? Which the answer to is yes.

Create an Account or Log In

Membership is free. Simply choose your username, type in your email address, and choose a password. You immediately get full access to the forum.

Already a member? Log In.

If they ask about the uniform I would. Some ask if they were in clean and neat uniforms.
I wouldn't, based on the criteria he was in uniform.
Anything else is bias and not objective reporting.
Yep, I agree with eyelove

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
If someone in food service is continually hiking up his pants, I'd report it. Odds are that he isn't washing his hands or changing gloves after each hike.
If he was pulling up his underwear, perhaps.

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
I think that they should report it. Lots of shops that I do ask about proper dress, I don't think this is proper. He might have on the right pants, shirt, uniform. I would state that he was in the correct uniform, but add that his underwear was exposed.
Lots of shops ask about dress. This one only asked if he was wearing the proper shirt with no name tag. If they asked if he was professionally dressed then the answer would be no and it would be included. The survey did not ask this question.

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
The question regarding name tag and shirt would be answered "Yes," as OP stated. If the employee worked in any industry other than food service, I'd let it go at that. But because he was noticeably and frequently adjusting his pants, I would write something in the comments. Usually, when underwear is worn above the pants, it's a planned fashion choice and doesn't need constant adjustment. This employee sounds disheveled, which as a customer, makes me wonder how clean those pants are. What if he didn't wear bus pants that day? Or worse, what if they are his bus pants? smiling smiley

I did a food shop recently. The answer to the question regarding hat, name tag, uniform was "Yes." Although there was no question that asked "Did the employee refrain from fluffing and swinging her ponytail over the prepared food and not wash her hands before serving the food to you?" I included a comment to that effect because in food service, I think it's important for the client to know.
I don't think pants falling down would be considered a uniform, but what do i know. I would mention it,.

Live consciously....
But it didn't ask about uniform. It asked if they were wearing a proper shirt (yes), apron (yes), and no name tag (yes).

I would not included it, but if I did, I would not state it as "his underwear was showing." I would simply state that the employee was wearing loose pants that he had to continually pull up and he did so without washing his hands or changing his gloves. If you state "his pants were low enough that you could see his underwear" it would come across as you didn't like seeing his underwear. Like Chris said, these days it's a fashion statement, and your opinion of his fashion statement is irrelevant.

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
Wearing a uniform only means appropriate for the job and clean, not really a uniform. Young guys wear the hanging jeans. I wouldn't say it in a mean way, but I'd say it. The question is: does this FF have dress requirements? Being the OP noticed and had to wonder if he/she should report it, is telling.

Live consciously....
@bgriffin wrote:

If you state "his pants were low enough that you could see his underwear" it would come across as you didn't like seeing his underwear.

Yeah, it could come across like that, lol.

We are, generally, supposed to represent the average customer. Does the average customer like seeing the employees' underwear?

As far as the report goes, if there was a narrative box I would mention it. If not, then I guess the client does not want to know.
@Irene_L.A. wrote:

Wearing a uniform only means appropriate for the job and clean, not really a uniform. Young guys wear the hanging jeans. I wouldn't say it in a mean way, but I'd say it. The question is: does this FF have dress requirements? Being the OP noticed and had to wonder if he/she should report it, is telling.

I think this is quite simple, The OP answered the question in their post

@jgoodwin wrote:

I can't really see where it fits in with the questions. The only question I see about uniform or appearance is quite specific - were they wearing proper shirt, apron and no nametag? Which the answer to is yes.


Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/18/2017 01:21AM by eyelove2shop.
It is called underwear and not visiblewear. I come from the camp that underwear should not be seen. Fashion statements are one thing when you're hangin with your crew off-duty. It is entirely another while working in any type of business.

On-the-other-hand, if the OP saw this activity in their short visit, then I'm sure the manager also noticed it. If this was an unacceptable uniform, a good manager should have addressed it with the employee.

"We're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl -- year after year..."
Many people think tattoos should not be seen. There is one FF shop that I know of that specifically asks if any of the employees had visible tattoos. At the same time Chipotle is very tattoo friendly. Changing times.

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
I don't think it is changing times so much as it is cyclical fashion trends or fads. The baggy pants and bell bottoms are in the midst of giving way to tight jeans with straight leg bottoms. Tattoos are just making their 30 year comeback and eventually will go out of vogue once again.

The big difference between fashion trends and tattoos is it is very easy to buy a new pair of pants...

"We're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl -- year after year..."
Just for debates sake, what if they hired a nudist (changing times) and for a kick one day he didn't wear jeans, just shorts, should you mention it, you know changing times and all. Maybe we'll live to see no respect for customers, don't bother to put on pants, no one cares....even mystery shoppers don't mention it.
Sorry, locked in the house all day with the horrendous storms we're having.....this was entertainment for me....

Live consciously....
I would. The client relies on insight from their evaluators - that's what we are paid for.

That employee is a client/guest-facing employee. They represent the brand. Dressed as such, they are representing the brand poorly.

To omit this information, in my opinion, would not be giving the client a comprehensive account of your experience. If I were the client, I would definitely want to know. This would concern me as much as a poorly maintained restroom, or anything else on the client's list of standards.
I had the same situation at a fast casual where the fellow was the food preparer and his jeans were below his undies...all the way below his butt. I reported it because it nauseated me and I also gave the location a low score for the question about recommending or returning with a clear explanation as to why. Maybe I'm old-school, but underwear showing while cooking food and tugging at them is definitely something I don't want to see, fashion or not. I found it revolting and had no qualms about reporting it. BTW, he wore a manager colored shirt.

*****************************************************************************
The more I learn about people...the more I like my dog..

Mark Twain
I can't speak for other companies, but if one of my shoppers asked if they should include this in a report, I would encourage them to. The editors can always take out the information if they know it's not something the client cares about. However, they can't add it in if they don't know about it. winking smiley

Administrative Manager for Shoppers' View
p: 616-608-1594 | e: christinew@shoppersview.com | w: www.shoppersview.com
I would have added in the report. I would write, the associate wore a clean uniform but his underwear was clearly visible above his pants. The pants were wore loose and hung past or below his hips. I would also add- the associate was continuously adjusting his pants while wearing food safety gloves. I did not observe the associate changing his food safety gloves or washing his hands after adjusting his clothing.
@ChrisCooper wrote:

The question regarding name tag and shirt would be answered "Yes," as OP stated. If the employee worked in any industry other than food service, I'd let it go at that. But because he was noticeably and frequently adjusting his pants, I would write something in the comments. Usually, when underwear is worn above the pants, it's a planned fashion choice and doesn't need constant adjustment. This employee sounds disheveled, which as a customer, makes me wonder how clean those pants are. What if he didn't wear bus pants that day? Or worse, what if they are his bus pants? smiling smiley

I did a food shop recently. The answer to the question regarding hat, name tag, uniform was "Yes." Although there was no question that asked "Did the employee refrain from fluffing and swinging her ponytail over the prepared food and not wash her hands before serving the food to you?" I included a comment to that effect because in food service, I think it's important for the client to know.

What are "bus pants"?
I'm glad someone else asked that question.......

There are reasons that a body stays in motion
At the moment only demons come to mind
When things do not fit directly in with specific questions, I include the information in the "comments to MSC" section. I say something like: I'm aware that this wasn't asked in the survey, however I do think it's important. Blah blah blah. Please include this in the report to the client if you feel it is appropriate to do so.

I have written my MSC a note even after my shop being approved if something comes up. I do a lot of car service phone shops. I will often complete the shop in the morning, submit the survey immediately after, and have my shop approved later that day. The following day, when I call to cancel my service appointment, sometimes the dealership cannot find my appointment in the system. I have written to the MSC to tell them this and gotten the response that this information is not required. After seeing that sort of response, I make a statement about how important I think it would be to the client. Now I just get a thank you.

I prefer to include additional information in the comments to the editor section. This way, the editor can decide if it should be included.
@ceasesmith wrote:

What are "bus pants"?
They are pants that are worn over your own pants when taking public transportation so that you don't pick up germs from where others have sat. It's not really "a thing." It's a reference from The Big Bang Theory [www.youtube.com]
@mlzg wrote:

When things do not fit directly in with specific questions, I include the information in the "comments to MSC" section. I say something like: I'm aware that this wasn't asked in the survey, however I do think it's important. Please include this in the report to the client if you feel it is appropriate to do so.

I have written to the MSC to tell them this and gotten the response that this information is not required. After seeing that sort of response, I make a statement about how important I think it would be to the client. Now I just get a thank you.

The "Thank You" you are receiving reads as a polite dismissive remark imo. They already told you they don't care about the update yet you are adamant in providing it to them. Why do people find it so difficult to follow directions? <--- That's a rhetorical question.
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login