Are we nice, generally, but mean to nice people when you are not in the spotlight?

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Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright

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@Irene_LA
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Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright
[i
wrote:



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/14/2018 02:48PM by Irene_L.A..
[/i]
@op: have you read The Ambassadors? George Lerner's first novel touches on thes important ideas you have mentioned, in the context of various fictional lives. As Lerner describes it, a generation and/or a different temperament are sufficient to provide opposing views of right, wrong, decency, inhumanity, or anything at all. In RL, Lerner has documented recent African historical atrocities. The inhumanity is always the same base wretchedness manifesting in diferent places and eras. Only the weapons of torture and destruction change.
Correct website (for those interested) is: The Wright Foundation.

Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright
How do you interpret "have a blessed day" into a "racial insult?"

@msimon-2000 wrote:

I like to think that I treat people, not only as I would like to be treated, but also similar to the way they have chosen to treat me. I think that just about sums it all up in one, long, run-on sentence!

I good example that happened recently. I encountered a person with a small table set up outside a local grocery store. He was soliciting donations for his youth basketball team. I engaged him in small talk asking about his team and season. At the end of the brief conversation, i elected not to donate and wished him the very best of success with his team. He ended the conversation with, "Have a blessed day." He could have been sincerely wishing me a blessed day in the religious sense. Or, he could have been using a somewhat secret, yet fairly widely known racial insult translating to "f@&# off." Not knowing his true intent and frankly not attempting to interpret his true underlying meaning, I immediately replied, "No, YOU have a blessed day." This way, regardless of his true intentions, I returned it in kind.

The internet doesn't make you smart. It makes you good at regurgitation.
Others said when they looked it up, they saw it as an alternative for F-OFF, nothing else.

The internet doesn't make you smart. It makes you good at regurgitation.
Not sure, but there may be an underlying ring to it, who goes around saying "Have a blessed day"? Sounds like maybe there is another secret meaning. I grew up in a big city, never heard it until I got to my now town.

Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright
There are at least 3 possibilities.

1. They are just incorrigible dumping chutes.
2. They are morphing Sheldon Cooper.
3. They are twisting PC because they can, which really means number 1 above,
which really means # 2 offsite.
It's a Southern thing for the most part (in my experience, anyway). The people who I have observed using it were mainly middle-aged, cheerful-seeming women. And the ones who have said to me were Caucasian, as am I, so I am quite sure it wasn't meant as a racial slur.

@Irene_L.A. wrote:

Not sure, but there may be an underlying ring to it, who goes around saying "Have a blessed day"? Sounds like maybe there is another secret meaning. I grew up in a big city, never heard it until I got to my now town.
I have heard people from several countries use phrases such as 'have a blessed day and others. They have meant this as a general blessing and not as a particular tradition's mantra or a specific affirmation for something sinister. These people are polite. They just want to express something for well-being. This is pleasant, not overly personal, and understood by many but not all people.

Picture an increasingly absurd and PC future, in which it is mandatory to participate in cursing because all methods of well-wishing and kindness, including but not limited to the use of 'have a blessed day' and other, similar phrases have been banned and banished from the printed, electronic, and other viewings, hearings, and usages. Did the associate use the exact phrase, "May you rot in hell, you ugly, smelly, intolerable piece of sh*t"? If not, explain in detail what the associate did or did not say. Describe their nonverbal expressions. If they did not approach you in a menacing manner, please describe whether and how they moved, and what their facial expression was. Also, please describe any gestures, sign language, or other bodily movements in detail. If yes, did you return the curse with something stronger? If not, explain in detail how you responded. Include a detailed description of your verbal and non-verbal response. Keep in mind that the editors will review the audio-visual record of your shop. If they detect any falsification, minimization, or demonstrated fear on your part, your shop will be excluded and you will be removed as a shopper with this company and blacklisted in the mystery shopping industry. The client may, at its discretion, have you and your known family, friends, and associates followed and/or dealt with via the client's chosen methods.
My first coming into hearing it was when in my town that was once mainly Born again Christians and doing solicitating, ringing one's doorbell and when we complained or seemed irritated, would always say "have a Blessed day". I really never thought it was a bad thing, just something that religion said, now I wonder. Perhaps in the beginning it was meant in a nice way, but many phrases have changed through the years, so.....

Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright


Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2018 05:32PM by Irene_L.A..
Yeah, if someone wants me to F'off, I would prefer they just say it in plain language and not fluff it up.
Years ago when I was a kid we had Mormons and a few Jehovah's Witnesses come to our door. My mom just wouldn't answer the door. "Regular" Christians never came knocking.
@JASFLALMT wrote:

Years ago when I was a kid we had Mormons and a few Jehovah's Witnesses come to our door. My mom just wouldn't answer the door. "Regular" Christians never came knocking.

Now, this is getting interesting. I think the fine point definition of Christian excludes Mormons, regardless of the words Jesus Christ, Latter Day Saints in their title. Some of those people do follow sound living guidelines, which pop up everywhere from the Bible, other major religions, and Humanistic teachings. Supposed real Christians may do this, too. This, to me, fits into the wide space that surrounds the narrow gate, which is the trading of one life for one with Jesus Christ, regardless of a religious title. Following through may require many changes. Or, it may mean a little change. Others may differ. I don't know about Jehovah's Witnesses who apparently, do not rejoice with those who rejoice. I do not know what they do with people who grieve. I only knew one Jehovah's Witness and encountered another who was sharply rude. Perhaps they had a bad day, so now I will grieve for me and them.

And away I go to consult Walter Martin's wonderful book. He explains so much there!
I have worked with several Mormons and one Jehovah's Witness. They did so much that was good and welcome in the workplace. There was the hilarious guy who sent the funny emails and made everyone happy. Everyone wanted to work with him. Another one earned enough money to pay for a semester or two and then quit the job. But oh, how they did the job! They got rave reviews all the time. The Jehovah's Witness was wonderful in every way except when it came to office parties. These were daytime events, and celebrated birthdays, etc. This one person did not join in, and they stood out like a sore thumb. The rest of the time they did their job well. They trained others quickly, and supervised easily.

As far as I can tell, that large space is where coexistence can happen- or should happen.
This particular sister is a Cuckoo bird (I have several others who are normal). Her fourth husband was a Mormon and that's how she became one. Her fifth husband is a Mormon as well, of course.

My grandparents and my uncle were awesome people. Yes, it's true that they did not celebrate birthdays and holidays and that was hard to understand when I was a little girl. My grandparents both died when I was about six. My grandmother would not get a blood transfusion or surgeries that could possibly have saved her life since it was against her religious principles, and my grandfather died about six months later of a heart attack (pretty sure it was a broken heart). My mother had a big issue with that religion before her Mom died but it became intense afterwards. If she did open the door whenever they came knocking, she gave them an earful about how their religion killed her mother and I am sure that they regretted showing up at our house...and they never came back again.
I'm not sure what your fine point definition of Christianity is, but I was raised a Mormon and I can assure you that Mormons are Christians. Mormons believe that Jesus is The Christ, the son of God and that he died for their sins. I am quite sure that is Christian.


@Shop-et-al wrote:

@JASFLALMT wrote:

Years ago when I was a kid we had Mormons and a few Jehovah's Witnesses come to our door. My mom just wouldn't answer the door. "Regular" Christians never came knocking.

Now, this is getting interesting. I think the fine point definition of Christian excludes Mormons, regardless of the words Jesus Christ, Latter Day Saints in their title. Some of those people do follow sound living guidelines, which pop up everywhere from the Bible, other major religions, and Humanistic teachings. Supposed real Christians may do this, too. This, to me, fits into the wide space that surrounds the narrow gate, which is the trading of one life for one with Jesus Christ, regardless of a religious title. Following through may require many changes. Or, it may mean a little change. Others may differ. I don't know about Jehovah's Witnesses who apparently, do not rejoice with those who rejoice. I do not know what they do with people who grieve. I only knew one Jehovah's Witness and encountered another who was sharply rude. Perhaps they had a bad day, so now I will grieve for me and them.

And away I go to consult Walter Martin's wonderful book. He explains so much there!

I enjoy awkward questions and uncomfortable silences. This gas station pavement is $%^@*#& hot.
((( JAS )))

@JASFLALMT wrote:

This particular sister is a Cuckoo bird (I have several others who are normal). Her fourth husband was a Mormon and that's how she became one. Her fifth husband is a Mormon as well, of course.

My grandparents and my uncle were awesome people. Yes, it's true that they did not celebrate birthdays and holidays and that was hard to understand when I was a little girl. My grandparents both died when I was about six. My grandmother would not get a blood transfusion or surgeries that could possibly have saved her life since it was against her religious principles, and my grandfather died about six months later of a heart attack (pretty sure it was a broken heart). My mother had a big issue with that religion before her Mom died but it became intense afterwards. If she did open the door whenever they came knocking, she gave them an earful about how their religion killed her mother and I am sure that they regretted showing up at our house...and they never came back again.

The internet doesn't make you smart. It makes you good at regurgitation.
I'd never say it is a racial slur, but a religious farewell, as we have many Born Again's up here and they always say it....blessed is a religious word, although words (these days) can have two meanings depending on your response.

Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.....
Dr. Judith Wright
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