Good deed

I go to the drive thru at McD's for my senior coffee and find the car before me paid for my coffee. I see it in parking lot and go to thank her, she had Florida license plates. I asked why and she said, why not, enjoy your day, you were polite and let me go first...who knew!! Have you had a good deed given to you and how?
I really smiled and thought how nice to do something for a stranger, starting day off right...smiling smiley

Live consciously....

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Irene, that is awesome! I absolutely love Random Acts of Kindness.

I was in the grocery store a few weeks ago. The lady in front of me had a cast on her leg. I asked her to wait until my items were finished ringing up so I could take her cart to her car.

Last month, when I volunteered at my church's food bank, I put together a bag of Ready To Eat (no cooking) food for a homeless dude in my neighborhood.

"There's so much trouble in this world; surrounded by miracles" - Citizen Cope
If I see someone in the grocery line with only 1-2 items and I have a cart full, I'll usually let them go 1st. I also keep supplies in my car that I can just hand out through the window: waters, granola bars, sometimes new socks, and sample size dog food packs. I am not rich, but I feel fortunate.
While pregnant, I have had most everyone young to older offer me their seat while taking mass transit. I have given people money who were short on cash while paying at the register; nothing more than a few dollars or less. I still ask my daughters to run and open/hold the door for the elderly or handicapped when out. Their favorite place is Chipotle right by the mall entrance. They still run whenever. I observed this nice lady helping someone with her groceries. Was that you Honny?
When we were still driving the ancient vehicle, we ran out of gaswhile working. The gas guage was demented and, apparently, had the vehicular version of Alzheimer's disease.It did not know when it had gas! Anyway, another person brought us gas, refused money, and said the were "doing a good deed". We offered again. More emphatically: " A good deed!"

So we look for ways to do little things.

A person should always choose a Halloween costume which is in direct contrast to her personality. (Lucy Van Pelt. From 'It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown'.)


Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/22/2019 01:56PM by Shop-et-al.
When in Chicago we take the train, and my daughter always without a look from me, offers her seat to an older person. I am proud of how she turned out, this is a small way to help and she helps others in her own way.
There was a homeless man sleeping under the cement awning in front of our post office for days, I brought a
box of food and sheepisly left it for him...they took him elsewhere, I hope he enjoyed the goodies. I do not do this often enough, so this is not a pat on my back.

Live consciously....


Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/22/2019 02:57PM by Irene_L.A..
@Irene, I don't do anything to get a pat on the back either. Your daughter is so very thoughtful. I, too will offer my seat. It's usually accepted graciously. Occasionally I will receive a reply "I am still young" or something to that effect. Your post prompted me to give a homeless man sleeping on the curb $20. He was sleeping and not soliciting. I placed a $20 bill in his T-shirt pocket.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/24/2019 09:17PM by Madetoshop.
@Madetoshop wrote:

Your post prompted me to give a homeless man sleeping on the curb $20. He was sleeping and not soliciting. I placed a $20 bill in his T-shirt pocket.

I am sure his local dealer will appreciate the extra twenty. If you want to help homeless people volunteer at a soup kitchen or donate to a local charity. Avoid the big charity organizations. CEOs of such organizations pocket packages of around $1 million.

Giving money directly to homeless people in most cases doesn’t help them. If you give the homeless money, you are part of the problem and not part of the solution.
Oh boy....somebody woke up on the wrong side of the forum today.

I applaud all of you for the good deeds you do. We never know why a person is homeless, but I would like to believe the person appreciated the $20 found in their pocket and they will use it wisely.

Kim
I have heard all kinds of instructions for how to "help" various types of people. This is good. Book provided helpful general guidelines for cash and homeless persons. But someone else handled an inspiration differently. I guess we all decide in a moment what to do with individuals we encounter in the moments of life.

A person should always choose a Halloween costume which is in direct contrast to her personality. (Lucy Van Pelt. From 'It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown'.)
@kimmiemae wrote:

I applaud all of you for the good deeds you do. We never know why a person is homeless, but I would like to believe the person appreciated the $20 found in their pocket and they will use it wisely.

Having spoken to someone who volunteers with homeless people on a regular basis, I have some knowledge on thIs topic. In her experience 95 percent of homeless people would spend the money on drugs or alcohol.

Of course, homeless people should be treated as individuals. If someone is truely concerned about the plight of the homeless, they need to get involved with a local charity. By getting to know homeless people, you can find out about their individual needs.

Dropping off a tray of ‘goodies’ from the back of the pantry is not really helping anyone. If you are concerned about the homeless problem be proactive.
I refrain from giving cash directly, anymore. One time I saw a man asking for spare change at a freeway off ramp. The light was red, so I unrolled my car window and handed him all the change in my center console - this was back when parking meters took coins, and would have amounted to around $4-5. Well! Apparently this was not enough money and he started leaning into the car, reaching for my purse and yelling at me for being CHEAP! Just about that time, my German Shepherd who was sleeping in the back of the Jeep, awoke from her nap and in one leap was on my lap, in his face, telling him to back off. I love my dogs!
@Book wrote:

@kimmiemae wrote:

I applaud all of you for the good deeds you do. We never know why a person is homeless, but I would like to believe the person appreciated the $20 found in their pocket and they will use it wisely.

Having spoken to someone who volunteers with homeless people on a regular basis, I have some knowledge on thIs topic. In her experience 95 percent of homeless people would spend the money on drugs or alcohol.

I've had the police tell me the same thing.

I worked in downtown Dallas 3-11. I would see the pan handlers asking for money presumably to go to the McDonalds a block away. I could see it from my seat at the lobby desk.

More often than not, when they got "$1.08" for the dollar menu (they accounted for the tax), they went to get beer at the 7-11 in the opposite direction from the McDonalds.

A lady who lived in the building worked for a non-profit. She drove around giving out sandwiches to the homeless during the day. There were several "regulars" that me and the overnight guy would have sandwiches for when they needed them. They didn't come every day, just when they needed them.

These were the same guys who would pick the cigarette butts out of the outdoor smokers station. That freaked me out the first time I saw it.
As @Monk-N-Nut illustrates we need to be careful when interacting with random homeless people. Even my friend who has built relationships with homeless people has had items stolen by them.

Homeless people may have mental problems or be dependent on substances so working with them in a control environment is best. Contact your local homeless shelter for information about programs such as serving Christmas dinner. These kind of activities are a good introduction into the lives of homeless people and the best way to help out.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/27/2019 11:12PM by Book.
While entering a restaurant, a diner sitting outside told my friend to watch where she stepped as there was dog poop. My friend whipped out her poop bag and cleaned it up.
When our bill came, the young man had paid for her lunch!
The twenty-something year old man in front of me at the grocery store check out didn't have a loyalty card. I handed the cashier mine. Man tried to hand me a ten dollar bill. After telling him to use it to buy his buddies pizza and he left I asked cashier if I had saved him anything off his invoice. Yes $16.00!
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