Second Round of Stimulus - What Do You All Want In It?

When you're employed, you pay part of the premium and the company pays part. When you leave the premium stays the same, but the employer doesn't pay part of it anymore. The COBRA rate is what the premium was all along, but you have to pay it all.

Some companies play some very dirty tricks to get former employees off COBRA.

@Sandy Shopper wrote:

Yeah, that's the thing about COBRA. Employers have to offer it, but they don't have to make it affordable. Over 20 years ago, my COBRA would have cost nearly a thousand a month. Went a few months with no insurance until the new job's insurance kicked in. A very scary thing to be single and uninsured!

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@panama18 wrote:

She said again yesterday that she won't go for a smaller package. "I don't think, strategically, it's where we should go right now" is what she told PBS Newshour.

Strategically. Ya like that? We are all pawns in her game.

@shoptastic wrote:

[www.bloomberg.com]

Pelosi Favors Slimmed-Down Stimulus Now, Then More in January
They might believe they have the upper-hand in negotiations, since they are asking for more and the GOP has more to lose. Trump and Mitch are up for re-election this November. I don't think their constituents would accept the excuse that they were trying to get them less stimulus and winded up with nothing.

I still think we'll get something decently big done, but it could take through September's end. ...Although, there is a lot of side-stuff being debated....mail-in ballots, bailing out bankrupt states, school funding, etc.
If they've been bankrupted by situations beyond their control (pandemic, natural disasters, etc) then yes, they should.
@Sandy Shopper wrote:

If they've been bankrupted by situations beyond their control (pandemic, natural disasters, etc) then yes, they should.

I would agree with that somewhat, but what process will we put in place to determine whether a state was bankrupted by a situation beyond their control? Or whether poor fiscal management by the state leadership cause the bankruptcy?
Essential workers - screwed once again. As long as the stock market is gaining there will be no stimulus package. They worked very fast and hard when the market was in trouble but now it is just crickets.
@teriraia wrote:

Essential workers - screwed once again. As long as the stock market is gaining there will be no stimulus package. They worked very fast and hard when the market was in trouble but now it is just crickets.
Well, technically, essential workers are working. smiling smiley Although, blue-collar and lower-income workers have greatly suffered. There was a chart I saw on CNN Business or Bloomberg (can't remember) that showed upper-income workers' employment has practically returned to the same levels pre-COVID. It's off by like just 1 or 2% from pre-COVID levels. On the other hand, lower-income workers are crushed. They are nowhere near back. And, yes, they will be facing eviction, hunger, permanent job losses, higher debt, bankruptcy, homelessness, etc. soon if nothing is done.

It's not just the wealth and employment figures that show great disparities in people's experiences. There is also the health outcomes. Here is one example (Florida): [www.theguardian.com]

The wealthy, who can afford to not work and/or can work from home and also live in less densely populated areas, are seeing less deaths in Florida. The wealthy mostly have done much better:
-stocks rebounded (technology indexes at all-time highs)
-employment rebounded
-health outcomes greatly better

I guess the one factor that tilts against some of the wealthy is age. Those with the most money are often older and the most at risk of bad outcomes for COVID. They may be stuck at home and living in fear.
@ wrote:

The majority of U.S. states are now approved to send workers the extra $300 weekly unemployment benefit from the federal government.

States have been applying for the funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) over the past few weeks. So far, Arizona and Texas have started paying out the claims.

The following states will also start paying out the enhanced benefit in the coming weeks: Alabama, Alaska, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Washington.
[www.cnbc.com]

So is this just a three week program extension?
These are FEMA finds and, because they were not sure how far they would stretch, only 3 weeks of funding is guaranteed to the states. Key word is "guaranteed." Lots of things could affect later funding. Ironically, the 3 weeks will end before Congress returns after Labor Day.

With all of the wild fires in CA and the storm devastation in Iowa, not to mention hurricane threats, FEMA finds may be needed to address those emergencies, as well. So, how it will be handled after 3 weeks is very much up in the air.

Based in MD, near DC
Shopping from the Carolinas to New York
Have video cam; will travel

Poor customer service? Don't get mad; get video.


Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/25/2020 05:22PM by walesmaven.
Yeah, it seems a bit wrong to take from FEMA during these crazy times.

California is a mess. ...mayyyybe the only silver lining is the burned down buildings need rebuilding. New construction jobs for people?
Who could predict the "lightning siege" that assailed the SF area? That is extraordinary, and even without covid, those fires would have generated an exceptionally heavy cost and need for additional funds. Have no doubt that actual, verifiable priorities will be addressed.

Things are not to be judged good or bad merely because the public think so. - Tacitus
In the meantime, it's a lot of jobs for people. Even here, after the recent hurricane and flash rain storm flooding (where some neighborhoods got totally soaked with a couple feet of water...some areas got so bad their houses were flooded inside), there is a lot of repair work. This always happens. Big storm = lots of construction/maintenance/repairmen coming out.

My hair stylist used to say she hated dating construction workers and would never do it again, because they usually were not reliable people (her view - not mine). They never knew when they could come upon work. An almost certainty, however, is lots more work after storms and fires in a region.

Flooding is horrible for the mold that follows oftentimes. I had that in one of my old cars.
[www.bloomberg.com]

@ wrote:

For reference, there were 13.55 million unemployed workers in the U.S. labor force in August, meaning about 25% consider themselves permanently jobless. By contrast, when unemployment peaked after the last recession in late 2009 at 15.35 million, about 6.82 million were deemed permanent job losers, or roughly 45%. On a percentage basis, August marked the sharpest increase in that ratio on record.
Permanent job losses are rising. This has been feared, but somewhat expected too. As PPP loans expire and employers can fire people without fear of jeopardizing their loan forgiveness, as workers once furloughed are now realizing their employer has decided to cut costs and downsize, or as workers come back to businesses that cannot survive anymore in the depressed economic environment, temporary layoffs in the past are becoming permanent.

I'm seeing analysis that we'll have at least the same or higher permanent job losses as the 2008 Global Financial Crisis when all is said and done. The next few months will be a big test, as reopening has begun and already sputtered a bit. Census hirings (a seasonal and temporary one-off) may not inflate future unemployment reports.
Latest Update:
Dems block a meaningless $300 billion GOP stimulus bill. The GOP previously proposed a $1 trillion bill, while the Dems proposed a $3 trillion one. So, yeah, the $300 billion one is offensive and a downgrade.
[www.usatoday.com]

Trump's FEMA-funded extended $300 extra unemployment benefits has expired as of September 5th for multiple states (TX being the biggest one): [www.bloomberg.com]

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 09/10/2020 08:40PM by shoptastic.
I have a wee job and am starting another one (yesterday's info on another post was an oops). I can still add merch and shops. I will not be eligible for fed money. I just have to work. I was thrilled when some of the senators proposed a targeted approach to the issue. This showed some restraint and courage. I was horrified by the enormity of the house proposal and that many people seem to want and demand that massive fed teat instead of other, incremental, and/or utterly different approaches to economic change.

Meanwhile, I need a nap. Then, it is time to get my HR stuff in order, grab a snack, and get to work on time,

Things are not to be judged good or bad merely because the public think so. - Tacitus
@Shop-et-al wrote:

I was thrilled when some of the senators proposed a targeted approach to the issue. This showed some restraint and courage. I was horrified by the enormity of the house proposal and that many people seem to want and demand that massive fed teat
*forgive my snarky mood - no sleep*
When the Federal Reserve stops bailing out junk-bond rated debt by our largest corporations, then maybe we can talk about giving less to average Americans is how I see it.
@ wrote:

instead of other, incremental, and/or utterly different approaches to economic change.
No more socialism and back up the Brinks trucks bailouts for corporations and the wealthy and "incremental"-ism and "restraint" for the poor/middle-class, please, Mr. Trump (not that you care, since you're bought by your wealthy donors)! grinning smiley

If you want austerity and responsibility, let's start with the wealthy/powerful/corporations. They can lead by example. If the money printing stops, it needs to stop for everyone. If it continues, then it needs to continue for everyone.

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 09/12/2020 03:44PM by shoptastic.
@ wrote:

More than 35,000 airline industry employees will be laid off from their jobs next week unless Congress is able to pass an extension of the Payroll Support Program (PSP) in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

“I want people to know about the amount of human suffering and economic pain that is going to be inflicted if a deal isn’t cut by October 1,” Airlines For America (A4A) President and CEO Nick Calio told Yahoo Finance. “It’s very real and it can be stopped. It can be prevented.”
[finance.yahoo.com]
I feel bad for the workers, but not the corporate execs.

Ginsburg's death puts some strain on the prospects for a stimulus deal before the elections. With attention focused on a Supreme Court replacement and Democrats possibly fighting back by holding out on stimulus, things may get dicey.

It might be time to bug your Congressional leaders with phone calls.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/22/2020 01:45PM by shoptastic.
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