How to determine mileage when riding subway

So, I'm keeping track of my mileage for shops. However, I am planning to take the subway system for some of the shops near me. How do I account for my mileage in this case? Is it just keeping track of the miles covered, like I would if I were driving? Or do I do something differently since I am taking a train instead?

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AFAIK, the mileage deduction just pertains to using your vehicle and the only thing you would have to deduct for subways and trains would be the price of the ticket.

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You can ask the conductor how many miles the train travels. JK.

You can only deduct our cost for transportation. Counting mileage is a means of figuring out the cost of the use of your car. If you take the bus or train then you deduct the cost of the ticket.
No deduction for miles unless you use mileage on your personal vehicle that is specified in the tax return. You can however save your tickets for the subway ride and expense that when you itemize.

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Happily shopping New England and beyond!!!!!
MS I was a tax agent for 12 years and the others are right. You cannot claim mileage for the subway. Just keep your receipts for the subway. You can claim them.
MSmichelle Wrote:
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> So, I'm keeping track of my mileage for shops.
> However, I am planning to take the subway system
> for some of the shops near me. How do I account
> for my mileage in this case? Is it just keeping
> track of the miles covered, like I would if I were
> driving? Or do I do something differently since I
> am taking a train instead?


Hmmm, would you calculate that as the bird flies or the rat scurries?

Happily shopping Rhode Island and nearby Massachusetts and Connecticut
A note for subway riders; For many of the shops I take that reimburse parking, I have been successful in negotiating the reimbursement of my subway tickets instead.

It's usually cheaper to by 2 day passes than to park at many restaurants in LA, and when I do bar shops, I feel much better about not driving. Even restaurants that shop the valet have made exceptions for me, so it never hurts to ask.
So if you deduct mileage for public transportation, can you also deduct bridge tolls? Another thing, if I borrow friend's car but don't have my own, can I still deduct mileage?
SteveSoCal Wrote:
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> A note for subway riders; For many of the shops I
> take that reimburse parking, I have been
> successful in negotiating the reimbursement of my
> subway tickets instead.
>
> It's usually cheaper to by 2 day passes than to
> park at many restaurants in LA, and when I do bar
> shops, I feel much better about not driving. Even
> restaurants that shop the valet have made
> exceptions for me, so it never hurts to ask.

I never thought about trying to negotiate out of the valet parking. I was considering only doing brunch at the place downtown as the valet does not work then...and I have been trying to dream up a way to bypass the parking lot at the museum so I can take the subway...the lot is not even run by them but evaluating the lot and the cashier are part of the job. Thanks for the tip Steve.
Market Force is the only company I know which reimburses for tolls and parking, and they claim it's not fair to some shoppers to reimburse some for public transit. I am guessing their logic is that bus/subway/train fare is the equivalent of gas money which is also not reimbursed, which is understandable.
Plusha Wrote:
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> So if you deduct mileage for public
> transportation, can you also deduct bridge tolls?
> Another thing, if I borrow friend's car but don't
> have my own, can I still deduct mileage?


You can deduct highway/bridge tolls on your taxes, but you should get receipts. In some cases, the IRS will use "history" in lieu of receipts, unless that's changed, but if you don't have a history of normal, regular expenses, try to get the receipts. If you can't always get them, write down the date, place, and amount of the toll, and why you were traveling and where you traveled to/from. Transfer the info to a master list (spreadsheet or Word doc) you keep for the year.

To the best of my knowledge, you can't deduct mileage if you don't have your own car--you have to have a car "on file" with your income taxes, with total miles driven in a year, percent of miles used for business, etc., etc., in addition to the actual business mileage driven in that year.

I learn something new every day, but not everyday!
I've learned to never trust spell-check or my phone's auto-fill feature.
Plusha Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> So if you deduct mileage for public
> transportation, can you also deduct bridge tolls?
> Another thing, if I borrow friend's car but don't
> have my own, can I still deduct mileage?


No one answered Plusha's question about borrowing a car. Due to personal reasons, my boyfriend has been driving me around at times using his car for some shops. I have been paying some money for gas and tolls or we call it a wash when I take him as my guest on fine dining and hotel shops. I have been keeping track of the mileage on his car when it is work-related.

So does the mileage and tolls in these instances count toward my taxes? Or do I just submit the gas receipts for his car under a different category?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“I'm the one that's got to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to.”
~ Jimi Hendrix

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.” ~ Mark Twain

“To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.” ~ J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
I think I did answer Plusha's question about borrowing a car--or tried to.... (Right above your post.) You have to "declare" a car on your taxes when you put it into service and you plan on using it for business. You have to note the mileage at the beginning of the year and at the end, for total miles driven, and itemize the total number of miles driven for business. My tax guy also calculates the percentage of miles used for business vs. personal. I'm not sure how that enters into the final numbers for the mileage deduction, but I'm not sure how someone could take mileage driven on another person's car, because that car would not be "in service" on your tax records.

I guess if someone wanted to try and circumvent this and claim their friend's car on their taxes, they could. But I sure wouldn't recommend it. Unless there's another way to claim mileage that's legitimate, I don't know how this could be done. Maybe our resident shopper who used to do taxes will weigh in, 'cuz he/she would know way more than I do. I'm just going by my own self-employment tax returns over the last couple decades.

I learn something new every day, but not everyday!
I've learned to never trust spell-check or my phone's auto-fill feature.
If using someone else's car I think you can still deduct expenses you are required to reimburse related to your use of it (mainly fuel, but could include proportional cost of oil changes, tire replacement, and other services). It would be similar to being able to deduct public transit and taxi fares, I think.
you cannot deduct your boyfriends car on your tax return.
That's like saying I am going to deduct the rental car mileage on my
tax return that im using this week. There is no difference between the two.

You can still deduct tolls, parking, etc since those are independent
on the vehicle.

You can however, deduct money that you pay him for it's use.
Just remember, if you pay him more
then 600 dollars...then you have to give him a 1099-misc and anything
under 600 he has to technically claim on his return as income.

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techman01 Wrote:
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> You can still deduct tolls, parking, etc since
> those are independent
> on the vehicle.
>
> You can however, deduct money that you pay him for
> it's use.

Which is what I was trying to get at. I think if she were to buy gasoline to put in his car to replace what she used, that would also be deductible, the same as if she reimbursed him $10.75 for 3.1 gallons or whatever.

> Just remember, if you pay him more
> then 600 dollars...then you have to give him a
> 1099-misc and anything
> under 600 he has to technically claim on his
> return as income.

Excellent point, and easy to forget.
Sounds like way too much math for me. I'll just pay him back with more physical pursuits. Win-win for both of us!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“I'm the one that's got to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to.”
~ Jimi Hendrix

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.” ~ Mark Twain

“To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.” ~ J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
P.S. I have my own car and I use it on a regular basis. And I have all my mileage recorded from the beginning of the year. I am recovering from a work-related injury so I am having trouble driving on certain days and on longer routes. This is where the boyfriend steps up to the plate and helps me out. I record the mileage from start to finish per shop when he is driving and using his vehicle for my jobs.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“I'm the one that's got to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to.”
~ Jimi Hendrix

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.” ~ Mark Twain

“To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure.” ~ J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
DrSquash Wrote:
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> If using someone else's car I think you can still
> deduct expenses you are required to reimburse
> related to your use of it (mainly fuel, but could
> include proportional cost of oil changes, tire
> replacement, and other services). It would be
> similar to being able to deduct public transit and
> taxi fares, I think.


Yes, that sounds correct, in terms of actual expenses paid out of pocket for transportation. But actual mileage, which is what I was referring to, that you put on a friend's car, or that they put on it driving you to shops, isn't deductible on your tax return.

I learn something new every day, but not everyday!
I've learned to never trust spell-check or my phone's auto-fill feature.
techman01 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> you cannot deduct your boyfriends car on your tax
> return.
> That's like saying I am going to deduct the rental
> car mileage on my
> tax return that im using this week. There is no
> difference between the two.
>

I thought they had changed that to allow either mileage or actual rental costs in the last year or two.

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