!!!! Exclamation marks

This is a genuine question. Is the use of exclamation marks a common thing in USA ?
Having moved to USA from UK a few years ago, the use of exclamation marks is very rare in English correspondence and used to highlight unusual things, i.e. an exclamation smiling smiley

I ask this because in normal correspondence from Shop assessors its used in almost every reply.
Is it just assessors who use it weirdly ?

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/14/2021 01:30PM by Kph100.

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IMHO, in "normal" business correspondence, exclamation marks are definitely not common, but they are used sparingly. I do not consider correspondence from Shop schedulers, assessors, etc. to be "normal" business correspondence. Schedulers often employ hype to try to convince people to read their emails and to accept shops. Guidelines and surveys often violate common grammatical rules, exclamation marks included.
@Kph100 wrote:

This is a genuine question. Is the use of exclamation marks a common thing in USA ?
Having moved to USA from UK a few years ago, the use of exclamation marks is very rare in English correspondence and used to highlight unusual things, i.e. an exclamation smiling smiley

I ask this because in normal correspondence from Shop assessors its used in almost every reply.
Is it just assessors who use it weirdly ?

Shopping Southeast Pennsylvania, Delaware above the canal, and southwestern NJ since 2008
Yes, I get that they may be used to get attention for shops, but what I was meaning was like if I asked a question about a shop, or asked for allocation, the replies often include !, seems rather odd.
A lot of these replies would fail the grammar tests they use in the shop texts.
Double standards.
Usage, including punctuation, differs between paper and Internet platforms. Textbooks really do not account for this.

Based in MD, near DC
Shopping from the Carolinas to New York
Have video cam; will travel

Poor customer service? Don't get mad; get video.
@walesmaven wrote:

Usage, including punctuation, differs between paper and Internet platforms. Textbooks really do not account for this.

AMEN!!
Thank you, Flash !

Based in MD, near DC
Shopping from the Carolinas to New York
Have video cam; will travel

Poor customer service? Don't get mad; get video.
I think it happens more often in online communication in an attempt to get across a friendly tone without using emoticons. I am guilty of loving exclamation marks! I try the reign them in, but sometimes they just escape.

Administrative Manager for Shoppers' View
p: 616-608-1594 | e: christinew@shoppersview.com | w: www.shoppersview.com
I actually think they are far from friendly.

Thank you or Thank you!

maybe its just my take but the latter appears condescending to me , maybe its a cultural thing smiling smiley
@Kph100 wrote:

I actually think they are far from friendly.

Thank you or Thank you!

maybe its just my take but the latter appears condescending to me , maybe its a cultural thing smiling smiley

I have to agree with Walesmaven that it is part of internet behavior. This comes about as the immediacy of communication tends to limit the thought development of normal writing. LOL or WTF communicates a response in few key strokes. I view 'Thank you!' as a shortcut for a longer expression of appreciation than the 'Thank you.' I would automatically say if you opened a door for me.

Overall I tend to not get excited about punctuation, capitalization and abbreviations in internet communication because if sarcasm or condescension are intended, they will show through in other verbiage of the communication.
I used to make a half-baked observation that exclamation points are used mostly by females, but these days I'm not so sure. Maybe it's an internet thing, as posited above. Personally, I can't remember ever using one.
Lots of good points above. I do find myself using exclamation points to avoid an unintended curtness to my tone. I believe usage is increased in younger people-- likely due to how much of their communication is via text modes. I agree it is a fine line to not sound unprofessional.
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