Beyond Hello - Are you F#@%ing SERIOUS?

I did two shops for these guys in the last few days. The first one got a 10/10 with a glowing review about how wonderful it was that I put in so much detail and explained everything above and beyond what they wanted, and how I did it exactly to specifications.

The second shop, not so much. It was a specialty boutique shop. I knew the second I walked out the door that I was going to have problems, but the problems they had were not what I expected. I sent them a note saying that there was no possible way I could have spent the entire 15 minutes in the store browsing for a certain product FOR MYSELF, and not for someone else, because there was a VERY limited selection of this product for men, and the lone employee stood there the entire time staring at me until it just became uncomfortable, and I left.

So they send the shop back requesting clarification on a couple of no answers. They didn't clarify exactly what kind of clarifications they wanted, just that I answered a few questions with a 'NO' so they needed me to tell them why. So here is one of the things they wanted clarification on.

Was the back door closed? Yes or No.

My answer - No.

They wanted a clarification, so this is what I sent them.

"In the back of the store, behind the counter, there was a rectangular hole of about 79 inches high by 44 inches wide that was equipped with a device of about the same dimensions that was designed to cover this rectangular hole in the wall, however it was not actually covering this hole. There was a large gap between the edge of the hole and the device meant to cover it. This gap, really more of a space in the space behind the hole, did not change, move, alter, or close at any time while I was in the store."

I'm hoping that since my original answer wasn't enough for them, that will suffice.

************************
Some times you just have to turn around, give a little smile, toss the match, set the bridge ablaze, and walk away.


Silver Certified on the Carolina Coast. You want fries with that?

Create an Account or Log In

Membership is free. Simply choose your username, type in your email address, and choose a password. You immediately get full access to the forum.

Already a member? Log In.

In the future, "I could see the alley behind the store through the back doorway." or variations on this theme would probably work just as well.
DrSquash Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> In the future, "I could see the alley behind the
> store through the back doorway." or variations on
> this theme would probably work just as well.


Holy crap, Thanks. I never even thought of that. That wasn't the case here as the back door appeared to lead to a closet or office, but yeah, I'll remember that. I am actually stunned that that didn't pop into this dense little brain of mine. Thanks!

************************
Some times you just have to turn around, give a little smile, toss the match, set the bridge ablaze, and walk away.


Silver Certified on the Carolina Coast. You want fries with that?
What you posted was extremely funny.

However, I've already seen the way that, on these forms we use, making the wrong move can change an answer in a way we didn't intend.

So, since it was a 'no' answer, and, presumably, not the answer they wanted to see, was there space on the original form to put: "The back door was slightly open, during the time that I was in the store."
I was just reading over the original stuff I wrote in the narrative section, and what upsets me is that I actually head dealt with the back door issue there. I originally wrote that when I entered the store, the employee was no where to be seen, but quickly came in through the back door. I guess I figured originally that that, plus the 'NO' answer on the original question would be sufficient. I guess writing down every word she said to me and every move she made while I was there wasn't sufficient. But yes, I do see your point. If there was a question that I answer no to, I should address it directly in a less sarcastic way.

I pulled the same type sarcasm stunt on ACL once when they kicked back a report for something very similar and they immediately accepted the shop. My wife said that the editors are probably rolling on the floor right now as they read it. I really hope this is the case.

************************
Some times you just have to turn around, give a little smile, toss the match, set the bridge ablaze, and walk away.


Silver Certified on the Carolina Coast. You want fries with that?
You gave a very interesting and unique answer. Good for you.

I remember encountering the same question. My answer was yes, because the front of the door had a mirror and the mirror reflected the contents of part of the stockroom which were various colourful clothing materials hanging out of a huge box.
Got the final review back. They gave me a 9. No comments about my answer. I'm pretty sure I got my point across.

************************
Some times you just have to turn around, give a little smile, toss the match, set the bridge ablaze, and walk away.


Silver Certified on the Carolina Coast. You want fries with that?
Oh, wow. I ALWAYS consider the "back door" question to be referring to egress from the PREMISES, not
just from the shopping area! In many, many areas, they have employee safety rules that call for the
"back door" (meaning egress from the building) to be closed and locked at all times -- this prevents a
burglar/thief from entering to rob the place, it also helps prevent employee theft.

If I can't see the "back door" by driving around the building, I always put in the report "I did not see a back door. It was not visible from the area customers are allowed into"; if I can FIND the back door,
and it's open (for instance, because an employee is standing outside to smoke), I always put that in.

Usually the employee is standing by the open door smoking, and there's a sign on the door that's quite visible that says "this door is to remain closed and locked at all times". LOL!!!!

And, of course, there's always the back door, with the highly visible "closed and locked at all times" sign, propped open with a bucket so the poor workers inside can get a breath of fresh air....and while
I feel for them (I really do!), I also always include that in the report.

In restaurants, the open back door also allows vermin and insects in.....but it's mostly a safety issue.



cease
That is seriously a question for one shop I have completed.

Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> gigishopper, hysterical! Maybe you should start a
> new thread!
As an editor, we are required to provide answers to all questions the shopper marks as NO (if it lowers the grade of the report). It is in the guidelines of all shops, even if it is a very obvious answer that we (as intelligent people) would not even give a second thought to, as the answer NO is self explanitory in most cases. The reports are sent to the client, and without there being a corresponding narrative to go with the answer that lowers the score of the report, the editor will get in trouble for the report not including an explanation. So, when you get your report back from an editor, asking for clarification, they are doing their job. Often times, an editor can just add a quick sentence clarifying for you (as should have happened in this case). Shoppers don't see which questions lower the grade of the report and which don't. The editor's view has all that information. I've seen many reports with simple questions, such as whether or not the back room door was closed, bring down the grade. Having previously worked in retail, store managers get paid bonuses on the secret shop grades. Therefore, it is very important to clarify your responses, as small and insignificant as though they may seem to you as a shopper. If a store can return a report for a low grade for any reason, they will. I hope that makes sense. PS, I enjoy your sense of humor! smiling smiley
Ishmael, those locked doors should have a crash bar for fires. You would only need a key to access it from the outside.

Equal rights for others does not mean fewer rights for you. It's not pie.
"I prefer someone who burns the flag and then wraps themselves up in the Constitution over someone who burns the Constitution and then wraps themselves up in the flag." -Molly Ivins
Never try to teach a pig to sing. It's a waste of your time and it really annoys the pig.
When they send it back for "No" answers to be explained that's usually because the client wants to make sure the answer should actually be No. I'm assuming by back door they meant the stockroom door. Saying the associate entered from the back door still doesn't explain whether the door was originally open or closed, or whether they closed the door behind them. The answer could also differ based on whether the door was propped open, whether people are coming in and out of the back, or whether a delivery was being made. A simple factual statement explaining the question will usually suffice.
I had a problem with them also with the 30 minute rule also. It is impossible with the type of shop it was to spend 30 minutes in the store without drawing a suspicion. They never say anything to me. I noticed it when I went back into my my shop log.
On VERY RARE OCCASSIONS, a shopper may click on the wrong radio button. (In reviewing my own answers, prior to submitting, twice I caught such an error.) If you are required to offer any sort of explanation in your report, even a statement such as "The back door was opened during my visit," confirms your "No" answer as correct.

MarlineM Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> "When they send it back for "No" answers to be
> explained that's usually because the client wants
> to make sure the answer should actually be No."
rme623 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> If you are required to offer any sort
> of explanation in your report, even a statement
> such as "The back door was opened during my
> visit," confirms your "No" answer as correct.

The majority of shops I have completed that required narratives want an explanation of all "no" answers. For simple questions like this door issue, I do what rme623 suggests. "The back door remained open for the duration of my visit" generally seems sufficient and explicit enough for most editors and clients. For a power question (e.g., "Was the associate helpful and courteous?"winking smiley, I would, of course, write a more detailed explanation of a negative response.

That said, the OP's answer was hilarious. I'm glad it was for Beyond Hello, though, as they seem to appreciate the human element of the shopping experience. A different company might not have welcomed the sarcasm.
I honestly regretted it a little as I hit submit, but they didn't jump me for it, so all was good it seems. Also, I like Beyond Hello shops, but they are few and far between, so I think maybe part of what I was doing was rebelling a little against the whole system, squarely aiming at a company that I really don't have anything against, but wouldn't kill me if they dumped me. I'm certainly glad they didn't though.

Anyways, I got to blow off a little steam in the process, and I hope I gave them and this forum a chuckle or two along the way.

************************
Some times you just have to turn around, give a little smile, toss the match, set the bridge ablaze, and walk away.


Silver Certified on the Carolina Coast. You want fries with that?
I always try to make sure I address all "no" answers. I recently got a review back on a report I did for a casual dining (sit-down but casual) where I scored a 10, but got the comment that I'd forgotten to address one of my "no" answers. The reviewer didn't say I needed to fix it, so I guess they did?

If the reviewer had to address it, I'm surprised I still got a 10. I would have understood a point off for missing a "no" explanation, especially if the reviewer just fixed it themselves. I was happy I got the 10, but surprised. smiling smiley

I need to go look up my pdf of that report, and see what "no" I didn't address... I'm suspecting (and hoping) it was a simple one, like the door being open or shut; but I won't know til I look. Heh.

Oh yeah, I agree about the part of just mentioning a simple no ("the door was not shut"winking smiley just to confirm that you really did intentionally click "no" in the report. Like another poster, I've discovered on my own final review that I accidentally clicked the wrong radio button once or twice. I make even more sure now, since my wireless mouse sometimes 'wanders' a bit from where I intend it to be. smiling smiley

All that said, I thought the OP's explanation about the door was *hilarious*. smiling smiley

Happiness is merely life's way of keeping you off-balance.
With dark glasses and a seeing eye dog, I sensed that the rush of freezing air was coming from the open door in the back. Ruff said it was, so it's true.
Although I would never encourage any of the fabulous shoppers on here, or that I deal with, to answer as you did... this gave me my giggle for the day. smiling smiley

Kristyn
Independent Scheduler
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login